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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Meat Manifesto: two Fenner-dishes to treat your dad to this Father’s Day

Andy Fenner believes you can’t sell meat unless you know what to do with it and, in between personal food philosophies and agricultural insights, Meat Manifesto celebrates various cuts of meat, by introducing readers to them and offering delicious recipes best suited to each specific one.

Andy smokes, grills and roasts his way through beef, pork, lamb, venison, poultry and even goat as recipes range from exotic (tongue, ears and offal) to basic (how to grill a pork chop).

The book will explain how to make bacon at home but also why you should be eating grass-fed beef, as opposed to feedlot.

It will show you how to butcher a chicken at home but also explain how to best cook it.

It is meticulously researched but presented in an approachable way.

The end goal is to walk people through various meat recipes, sure, but also to strengthen the reader’s relationship with their supply chain by asking them to consider if they really are happy with the status quo.

This Father’s Day, treat your dad to one of these two deliciously meaty dishes – and the book, of course!
 

Lamb rump with deep fried capers and anchovy aioli

 

 

Most of us buckle before a whole leg of lamb roasted for Sunday lunch, but turn your attention to the smaller, more delicate rump as an easy weeknight meal for two. It’s a cut that invites you to try the meat a little pink in the middle. Anchovies work well with lamb and I love how the deep-fried capers in this recipe add texture. Incidentally, capers are an age-old accompaniment to mutton; this meal featured in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and, frankly, what’s good enough for the bard…

Cooking time: 20–25 minutes

Serves 4

For the lamb
2–3 (800g in total) lamb rumps
salt, to season
black pepper, to season
2–3 sprigs thyme, destemmed

For the capers
2 Tblsp capers, drained
1 cup canola oil

For the aioli

1 garlic cloves, peeled, whole
1 egg yolk
100ml olive oil
100ml canola oil
1 Tblsp tinned anchovies, drained, finely chopped
½ tsp sea salt

Preheat the oven to 200°C.

With a sharp knife, score the fat side of the lamb rump, coat on all sides with olive oil and rub generously with sea salt, black pepper and thyme.

On the stovetop, heat an ovenproof pan over a medium heat and cook the rumps (one at a time, if necessary), fat-side down until browned.

Place the pan in the oven and roast for another 20–25 minutes or until done to your liking (use a meat thermometer to establish the internal temperature: I’d recommend 60°C for this cut).

Remove from the oven, set aside and rest for 15 minutes.

For the aioli:
In a bowl, crush the garlic and add the sea salt. Whisk in the egg yolk.

Combine the olive and canola oils.

Put the garlic and egg mix into a food processor, set the paddle on its lowest setting and very, very slowly add the oil mixture.

When the aioli is a thick, yoghurty consistency, remove, place in a bowl and fold in the anchovies.

For the garnish:
In a deep pot on the stovetop, heat the canola oil and carefully add the capers. Cook until they “pop”.
Remove with a slotted spoon.

To serve: thickly slice the lamb rump and fan onto a plate. Spoon over a dollop of anchovy mayo and top with capers.


Burnt fig, mozzarella and biltong salad

 

 
We openly celebrate cured beef from abroad like bresaola (a dry-cured beef speciality from Northern Italy) but, weirdly, South Africans don’t treat biltong with the same respect.

Biltong shouldn’t be restricted to a snack in front of the rugby or road-trip fuel. We should celebrate our homegrown speciality cured meat more. For this recipe, I’ve used flavours that
I know work with bresaola and would be pretty great with biltong too. Cooking the figs releases their sweetness, a neat counter to the salty beef.

The result is a quick meal that looks impressive and tastes delicious.

Preparation time: less than 10 minutes

Serves 4

For the figs
olive oil, enough to cover the base of a pan
8 ripe figs, halved lengthways

For the salad
20ml olive oil
5ml sherry vinegar
sea salt, to season
cracked black pepper, to season
½ red onion, finely sliced (use a mandolin, if possible)
2 cups watercress, washed, dried

to serve
150g wet, lean beef biltong, thinly sliced
1 x 125g ball fresh mozzarella

For the figs
On the stovetop, heat enough olive oil to cover the base of a pan and place the figs, cut-side down.
Fry for 2–3 minutes (it’s okay if deep colour develops).
Remove the pan from the heat.

For the salad:
In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper and, using a fork, whisk to emulsify.
In a deep, non-reactive bowl, combine the red onion and watercress leaves and pour over the dressing. Use your hands to mix gently, but be careful not to bruise the leaves.

To serve: plate the dressed leaves as a base on a large platter and top generously with the beef biltong. Scatter torn mozzarella and arrange the cooked figs on top.

Photography: Craig Fraser
Food styling: Justine Kiggen

Meat Manifesto

Book details


» read article

Book launch – Johanne 14: Real South African Food by Hope Malau

Johanne 14 explores the secrets of simple, home-cooked meals in South Africa’s townships. Told through the eyes of award-winning food writer Hope Malau, the book features authentic, traditional dishes cooked with love, and acknowledges the ability of countless unsung kitchen heroes – the mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings – to make culinary magic with often very little. It is a vital glimpse into South African township life; moreover, it is a celebration of culture, resilience, human spirit, community and family – through the shared meal.

A head of cabbage can be cooked in so many different ways; it is inexpensive and goes with anything or nothing at all. You can eat it raw, boil it or fry it, combine it with any other vegetable and it will give you a wholesome meal every time. Hence it was dubbed Johanne 14 – if you have cabbage you should not let your heart be troubled. – Chef Malau

Event Details


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“The book is to show us who we are and what South Africa is about” – Hope Malau, launch of Johanne 14

On Thursday the 18th of May, Quivertree Publications hosted several guests at the Lunch Launch of Hope Maulu’s Johanne 14. Guests were wined and dined while embarking on a culinary journey through the townships of South Africa. Linda Mali of Edgars Club Magazine facilitated the conversation on the book that she described as being, “more than just a collection of recipes.”

The rich aromas of African cuisine filled the air at Quivertree. Guests were abuzz and pleasantly greeted with an option to taste home-made Ginger beer, Mageu, or both. The smells and tastes were reminiscent of hearty family Sunday lunches.

Malau, who grew up in Jouberton, Kleksdorp, explained that the book brings about an understanding of how the township works. The title, Johanne 14, came about because he loves the scripture John 14, “you should not let your hearts be troubled if you have cabbage in the home,” he chuckles. The award winning chef goes on to explain that cabbage is a staple in the township because “it only costs R5 a head,” and is so versatile, supposedly taking away the troubles of everyday cooking, he has come to call it Johanne 14.

From a young age, the food writer was exposed to different tastes and styles of cooking. He spent a lot of time in a mine kitchen where his father worked and took a liking to the chef. Living in a diverse mining community, Malau experienced foods from all over South Africa. He fondly remembers his mother and grandmother going to cook at community functions, “Where are you going, Mama?” he would ask, “I’m going to peel [vegetables],” and he wouldn’t see her for the rest of the day. “Whether you knew the family or not, you had to help,” he recalls.

Out of over 60 recipes that the book showcases, Malau says his favourite is the tripe because, as his wife describes it, “It goes down.” He goes on to say that while he included mostly simple recipes, there are a few that are “bonding experiences with multidimensional flavours” such as the cow trotters. “I did not want the book to be too finicky” Malau explains, “The book is for everyone. To show us who we are and what SA is about. It’s about making a lot from a little [and] taking that little bit of money that you have and making it taste magical.” This is evidenced is the use of unconventional ingredients such as Cremora coffee creamer in samp, to mention a few.

Quivertree ended off the launch with a taste journey through the pages of Johanne 14 and the streets of South African townships that had many of the guests sharing their own experiences with food and life in South Africa and Africa as a whole. Malau says the book is a celebration of who he is. – Kasuba Stuurman, @kasuba_sun

 
 

 
 
 

Johanne 14

Book details


» read article

Hope Malau’s Johanne 14: Real South African Food now available

Johanne 14 explores the secrets of simple, home-cooked meals in South Africa’s townships.

Told through the eyes of award-winning food writer Hope Malau, the book features authentic, traditional dishes cooked with love, and acknowledges the ability of countless unsung kitchen heroes – the mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings – to make culinary magic with often very little.

It is a vital glimpse into South African township life; moreover, it is a celebration of culture, resilience, human spirit, community and family – through the shared meal.

A head of cabbage can be cooked in so many different ways; it is inexpensive and goes with anything or nothing at all.

You can eat it raw, boil it or fry it, combine it with any other vegetable and it will give you a wholesome meal every time.

Hence it was dubbed Johanne 14 – if you have cabbage you should not let your heart be troubled.
 
 
Chef Hope Malau grew up in Klerksdorp in the North West Province eating traditional Sotho food prepared by his dad, who worked in a mine kitchen. Instilled with a deep love for cooking from an early age, Hope went on to study at the Professional Cooking Academy in Rustenburg before garnering experience at various restaurants in Cape Town. Hope is currently the food editor for DRUM magazine and has also won the prestigious Galliova Food Writer of the Year for the past two consecutive years.

Book details


» read article

Launch: Meat Manifesto by Andy Fenner

Meat Manifesto

Andy believes you can’t sell meat unless you know what to do with it and, in between personal food philosophies and agricultural insights, the book celebrates various cuts of meat, by introducing readers to them and offering delicious recipes best suited to each specific one.

Andy smokes, grills and roasts his way through beef, pork, lamb, venison, poultry and even goat as recipes range from exotic (tongue, ears and offal) to basic (how to grill a pork chop).

The book will explain how to make bacon at home but also why you should be eating grass-fed beef, as opposed to feedlot.

It will show you how to butcher a chicken at home but also explain how to best cook it.

It is meticulously researched but presented in an approachable way. The end goal is to walk people through various meat recipes, sure, but also to strengthen the reader’s relationship with their supply chain by asking them to consider if they really are happy with the status quo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Join us for the Launch of Andy Fenner’s new book: Meat Manifesto.

Attached is the invitation with all the event details. Herewith with the line-up for all the ‘super heroes’ attending:

3:00pm Media arrives
3:30pm Basic butchery and tour of premises only for media attending & facilitated by Andy.
3:45pm Andy in conversation with farmers Piet and Koot Prinsloo.
4:00pm Public arrives
4:15pm Andy in conversation With Abigail Donnelly.
4:30pm Book signing.
5:00pm Food is served.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Book details


» read article

Four culinarians and one illustrator to look out for at Kingsmead Book Fair

Join us on Saturday 13 May at the sixth annual Kingsmead Book Fair for fun culinary conversations by some of South Africa’s most prolific food-writers.

This year, five Quivertree authors – Vickie de Beer, Anna Trapido, Mpho Tshkudu, Dorah Sithole and Mieke van der Merwe – will be dishing the goods on everything food ‘n such (and in Mieke’s case, the art of drawing.) Be sure to catch them there.


Vickie de Beer
(9.30-10.15)
(The Low Carb Solution for Diabetics / My Low Carb Kitchen) Award-winning foodie, Vickie de Beer, shares one of her low-carb, gluten-free and sugar-free recipes with us.

Anna Trapido & Mpho Tshukudu (Eat*Ting) (10.45-11.30) discuss their collaboration in exploring African food

Dorah Sitole talks to Hilary Biller about The Great South African Cookbook (13.45-14.30)

Mieke van der Merwe (author of Beautiful South Africa) will be stationed in the courtyard throughout the Book Fair doing colouring-in demos and talks.
 
 

The Low Carb Solution For Diabetics

Book details

 
 

My Low Carb Kitchen

 
 
 
 

Eat Ting

 
 
 
 

The Great South African Cookbook

 
 
 
 

Beautiful South Africa


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Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
The Great South African CookbookThe Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra recently held a planting day. The community garden – which used to be a dumping site – is a beneficiary of the sales from The Great South African Cookbook, published by Quivertree Publications.

Partners and sponsors of the garden include the Nelson Mandela Foundation, City of Joburg, Food & Trees for Africa (FTFA), Quivertree and Urban Fresh, the two-man company in charge of garden sales.

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 

Started in 2011, the Lenin Street Market Garden has received various support from a number of organisations and held different farming and gardening initiatives. But it was time to “kickoff” intensive training, said Robin Hills from the FTFA food garden department. The training would do two things, Hills said. Lessen the garden’s dependency on outside sources and increase output.

“A lot of these activities continue, but they continue in separate little silos. The cookbook has kind of brought it all together. Because it’s like now we’ve got to focus. So this is the kickoff.”

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
Among the book’s contributors in attendance were former True Love food editor Dorah Sitole and Johannesburg-based chef David Higgs.

The response the cookbook was receiving has been “amazing”, Higgs said, adding that, “I love the simplicity of the book. It’s easy reading. And everybody can do it.”

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
Urban Fresh, the garden’s brains and in charge of sales, joined the garden in April. And had done a lot of work to transform the place.

Co-owner Fazlur Pandor talked about the actions they had undertaken since joining. The garden had been a dumping site before.

“We’ve gone to a lot of effort to clean the soil first. When it started, it wasn’t like this. We’ve come a long way. We do soil tests. And we make sure it’s actually safe. We add compost and manure.”

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
Business partner Rogan Field outlined Urban Fresh’s future plans – packaging and processing tomatoes “properly”.

“Eventually, we want to look into value adding, making chili sauces.”

A cold room in the garden premises gave them an advantage over other co-operatives in their network, Field said. However this was no reason for Urban Fresh to “outcompete” them, he said.

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
“Rather to say that this project now must outcompete the other projects, how do we incorporate this project so they can support each other?”

At the garden’s initial opening in 2011, former Joburg Mayor Parks Tau said that communities had no excuses not to utilise land for their own benefit.

“There can be no justification for anyone in Johannesburg to go to bed hungry when there is space that people can use to produce vegetables for their own consumption,” he said at the time.

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
Five years later, the garden now supports 28 employees.

While Urban Fresh talked about expanding their network – currently they supply crops to surrounding establishments – Pandor said “building the trust of the community” was more important than maximising their production levels.

“It’s about building the trust of the community,” Pandor said, “It’s about developing a little bit of skills. So we’re not hugely focused right now on achieving maximum production. For the last six months it’s really about just engaging and solidifying our space.”

Pandor’s brother Haroon criticised people who loved calling for “land grab”. If the people were serious, they would, perhaps, plant tomatoes, he said.

Communities utilising land for their own benefit: Lenin Street Market Garden in Alexandra holds a planting day

 
Lungile Sojini (@success_mail) tweeted live from the event:

Book details


» read article

Join Quivertree Publications at a pop-up market in Cape Town – with discounted books

null
Braai: Reuben on FireThe Low Carb Solution For DiabeticsThe Great South African CookbookReal Food - Healthy, Happy ChildrenEat Ting
Indigenous Plant PalettesCook BetterStar FishTartsThe Real Meal RevolutionA Life Digested

 
Quivertree Publications will be hosting a pop-up market from 2-3 December 2016 at 147 Main Road, Rondebosch.

There will be a Quivertree Book Shop selling your favourite Quivertree titles at a discount – come and stock up on your Christmas gifts here!

Reuben Riffel, Pete Goffe-Wood and Obie Oberholzer will be around from 3 PM on the Friday afternoon to sign books.

On 3 December, there’s a fun food workshop for children (ages two to six), hosted by experienced clinical dietician Kath Megaw’s Nutripaeds team in the photographic studio. Designed to expose children to sensory experiences, teach them about healthy ingredients, and help them develop fine motor skills, this event costs R120 per child, and prior booking is essential. (Please email thembela@quivertree.co.za or call 021 686 6849.)

But that’s not all, below is a list of stallholders that you can expect to see at the market:

Peta Becker, crochet art
Jackie Knutsen, sojo children’s wear
Dan Wickham, Garagista artisan beer
Janine Davidson, Scarab jewellery
Pete Goffe-Wood, steak rolls
Karen Canning, lis-spa, beauty products and treatment vouchers
Ilse Menck clothing
Nondumiso wine
Ceramics by Louise Gelderblom & Karen Henstra
Skinny laMinx
Amanda and Kathleen from Nutripaeds will host a Clever Cooks children’s food workshop in the photographic studio
Verushka Louw – cakes, biscuits and pastries

Event Details

  • Date: Friday, 2 and Saturday, 3 December 2016
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM
  • Venue: Quivertree Publications
    147 Main Road
    Rondebosch
    Cape Town | Map
  • Facebook event: Click here for more

Book Details


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The Great South African Cookbook – a collection of recipes by SA’s finest – launched in Cape Town

Guest, Siba Mtongana and guest
The Great South African Cookbook

 
The Great South African Cookbook was launched at a glittering function in Cape Town recently.

When you the hear the names Reuben Riffel, Ina Paarman, Siba Mtongana, Dorah Sithole, Jan Braai and Abigail Donnelly, your thoughts (and tummies) immediately set off on a deliciously satisfying journey where the food experience (albeit on television or in a book) is so deep, it’s hard to imagine not sharing it with anyone. This is precisely what 67 of the country’s finest cooks, chefs, bakers, gardeners, foragers, farmers and local food heroes did – shared with us the food they love to cook for the people they love.

Reuben Riffel and Andy FennerPete Goffe-Wood

 
The satiny, metaphorically melt-in-your-mouth cookbook is published by industry-revered Quivertree Publications and features crisp, clean photography that captures the essence of what it means to be a South African. With over 130 recipes decadently spread like ganache on a chocolate cake, there’s almost no need to wade through the ingredients to envision the outcome of each of these dishes. Expect to find tried and classic favourites alongside contemporary fare. It’s about diversity and creativity – and The Great South African Cookbook certainly lives up to this mandate.

The book

 
As the Master of Ceremonies for the evening, celebrity chef and author of Kitchen Cowboys Pete Goffe-Wood pointed out, this book is more than just a lip-smacking collection of recipes, it is a beacon for social justice and is completely geared towards humanity. Sello Hatang, Chief Executive for The Nelson Mandela Foundation, echoed these sentiments, saying that food is something that we don’t often think of as being a necessary item to free our brothers and sisters out of poverty, but is certainly is, and it is one of the reasons that the foundation has chosen to collaborate day or night on this book to ensure its success. The foundation will receive all royalties from the book sales to cultivate food security and agricultural projects that will improve the lives of those in need, both socially and economically.

Craig Fraser, Justine Drake and Glenda PhilpKobus van der Merwe and Cass Abrahams

 
Although at times difficult to coordinate the busy schedules of these celebrities, everyone was committed and stirred into action by a resolute editorial committee. The result: A scrumptious book that embodies South Africa. From the colourful suburb of Bo Kaap to the strawberry producers of KwaZulu-Natal, the contributors in this book have shared their homes, their stories and their hearts – a testament that food is a personal journey and it’s something that must be done with your whole heart.

So, what will you cook for the people you love?

Tracy Swain (@swain_me) tweeted live from the event:

 
Facebook album


 

Book details


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Don’t miss the launch of The Great South African Cookbook

Invitation to the launch of The Great South African Cookbook

 

The Great South African CookbookQuivertree Publications in association with Exclusive Books is delighted to invite you to the launch of The Great South African Cookbook.

The event will take place at Exclusive Books Hyde Park on Thursday, 18 August.

See you there!

The Great South African Cookbook – 67 contributors, 150 recipes and 372 pages with personal stories from each contributor alongside stunning photography shot entirely on location around South Africa.

Event Details

  • Date: Thursday, 18 August 2016
  • Time: 6:00 PM for 6:30 PM
  • Venue: Exclusive Books Hyde Park
    Shop U30 Hyde Park Corner
    Cnr Jan Smuts Ave & William Nicol Dr
    Craighall | Map
  • Refreshments: Come and join us for a glass of wine
  • RSVP: Exclusive Books Hyde Park, hydepark@exclusivebooks.co.za, 011 325 4298

Book Details


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